2020 Annual International Programme

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All sessions are 1 hour and will include time for questions.

Session No Date & Time Session Details

1

19 November 2020
Thursday

16.00 - UK / 17.00 - CET

Spotlight California: The CCPA from compliance to enforcement & the new CPRA

Jennifer Archie, Partner, Latham & Watkins, USA
Michael Rubin, Partner, Latham & Watkins, USA

Chair: Stewart Dresner, Chief Executive, Privacy Laws & Business

More details

2

23 November 2020
Monday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

Switzerland’s new data protection law’s changes impacting business

Urs Maurer-Lambrou, Delegate International Affairs, Swiss Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioner

Chair: Valerie Taylor, Consultant, Privacy Laws & Business

3

26 November 2020
Thursday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

International data transfers after the European Court’s Schrems II judgment

Wojciech Wiewiórowski, European Data Protection Supervisor
Geoffrey Devin, Legal Officer, Policy and Consultation Unit, European Data Protection Supervisor

Chair: Laura Linkomies, Editor, Privacy Laws & Business

4

30 November 2020
Monday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

Nigeria: Operating under the Current Data Privacy and Data Protection Framework

Rotimi Akapo, TMT Partner, Advocaat Law Practice, Nigeria

Egypt’s data protection law 2020: Start preparing now

Masha Ooijevaar, Associate, Clyde & Co, UAE

Chair: Laura Linkomies, Editor, Privacy Laws & Business

5

3 December 2020
Thursday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

The increasing Record of Processing Requirements around the globe – A Review & Recommendations

Frank Madden, Principal, Privacy and Data Protection, Promontory, UK

Chair: Helena Wootton, Correspondent and Data Lawyer, Privacy Laws & Business

More details

6

7 December 2020
Monday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

How the UK is assessing the adequacy of, and free flow of data with, other countries and vice versa in the post Brexit era

Oliver Marsh, Head of Data Adequacy (EU/EEA), Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS), UK
Urs Maurer-Lambrou, Delegate International Affairs, Swiss Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioner
Charles Taillefer, Director at the Privacy and Data Protection Policy Directorate, Innovation, Science, and Economic Development, Canada

Chair: Valerie Taylor, Consultant, Privacy Laws & Business

  • The DCMS is the UK government department. responsible for data protection law policy

7

10 December 2020
Thursday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

The only way is Ethics

Rachael Annear, Senior Associate, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, UK
Ellis Parry, Data Ethics Adviser, Technology and Innovation, ICO, UK
Giles Pratt, Partner, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, UK

Chair: Stewart Dresner, Chief Executive, Privacy Laws & Business

8

14 December 2020
Monday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

Privacy Soothsaying? Good practice in impact assessing AI tools

Reuben Binns, Associate Professor of Human Centred Computing, University of Oxford, UK
Simon McDougall - Executive Director - Technology Policy and Innovation, ICO, UK
Peter Church, Counsel, Linklaters, UK
Richard Cumbley, Partner, Linklaters, UK

Chair: Stewart Dresner, Chief Executive, Privacy Laws & Business

9

17 December 2020
Thursday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

Facial recognition and other biometric data in employment and consumer contexts

Brent Homan, Deputy Commissioner, Compliance, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
Cameron Craig, Deputy General Counsel & Group Data Protection Officer, HSBC, UK
Jane Finlayson-Brown, Partner, Allen & Overy, UK
David Smith, Special Advisor, Allen & Overy, UK

Chair: Stewart Dresner, Chief Executive, Privacy Laws & Business

10

11 January 2021
Monday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

Cyber/data breaches and a Merger & Acquisition transaction

Rebecca Cousin, Partner, Slaughter and May, UK

Chair: Valerie Taylor, Consultant, Privacy Laws & Business

11

18 January 2021
Monday

14.00 - UK / 15.00 - CET

My business wants to monetize its data – Help!

Fiona Maclean, Partner, Latham & Watkins, UK

Chair: Helena Wootton, Correspondent and Data Lawyer, Privacy Laws & Business

 

Nowhere to Hide is a privacy issue which applies to both individuals and organisations.

Do individuals have somewhere to hide? For the mass of individuals, the question is whether they can pursue their daily lives without always being tracked? For privacy advocates, a high degree of control over the collection and use of one’s personal data is a fundamental right, at least in most of Europe, and increasingly so elsewhere.

Privacy advocates want to maximise anonymity. But there is a tension between this objective and the wish by billions of people to be connected to friends via a host of online services. Research by the Norwegian Consumer Council and academics shows how leading companies influence people by the use of powerful, persuasive techniques that are not transparent.

Adtech, facial recognition and other biometric identification techniques make privacy a concept stretched to breaking point, despite some companies making an effort to adopt anonymising techniques and accountability programmes.

If privacy for individuals is in danger of becoming a mirage, how effective are the countervailing powers? They fall into two main categories:

  • regulatory action in the form of Data Protection Authorities’ sanctions (warnings, fines, orders to amend and/or shut down processing etc); and
  • growing scope for collective (class) action, in the US; parts of Asia; and in Europe, through GDPR rights for individuals to work together, or via representative organisations, to seek redress for both material and non-material damage.

Do companies have somewhere to hide? Companies are highly visible but often their collection and use of personal data is opaque, as revealed by investigations in Canada and the United Kingdom into Facebook/Cambridge Analytica, and the UK Information Commissioner’s investigations into adtech. Greater transparency is becoming compulsory.

It is now an open question whether data protection law alone can be an effective constraint on corporate appetite for personal data. However, there is a trend in many countries towards the convergence of data protection, consumer and competition laws, such as by the German Federal Cartel Office action against Facebook (not yet concluded). But not all regulators agree that this is an appropriate way forward.

Is there a way to redress the balance to give law abiding individuals somewhere to hide if they wish, and to ensure that companies and the public sector have fewer places to hide from making clear their harvesting of personal data? ‘Data havens’ are fast disappearing as more countries adopt strong data privacy laws, and extra-territorial jurisdiction is starting to become the norm.

Our 33rd Annual International Conference will cover these and many other issues.

SPEAKERS

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