International E-news - March 2011

23/03/2011
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  1. France:  CNIL fines Google a record 100,000 euros for Streetview, Latitude
  2. EU Justice Commissioner outlines DP reforms
  3. US FTC gives evidence on Do-Not-Track

1. France:  CNIL fines Google a record 100,000 euros for Streetview, Latitude

On 17 March France’s Data Protection Authority, the CNIL, imposed its highest ever fine of 100,000 euros on Google for collecting data about Wi-fi using Streetview and location-based information using services such as Latitude.  The CNIL had conducted spot checks on Google which revealed violations such as collecting data on Wi-fi without the knowledge of those concerned and capturing content such as IDs, passwords, login details and email exchanges. The fine was imposed because the CNIL had given notice to Google in May 2010 but Google had not fully complied.

Ensure now that your organisation will not be caught failing to comply with France’s data protection and related laws. PL&B Privacy Officers’ Network Meeting in Paris, on 6 April, provides advice on all aspects of complying with the French DP law. The full programme is at http://www.privacylaws.com/Documents/EPON/France/France_Agenda.pdf

The original fee of £675 covered both the April 5th Briefing and the April 6th Roundtable. But with all places taken for the Briefing, we are now offering you a reduced fee of £350 for the Roundtable, if you register by the close of business on Tuesday 29th March.

Register by e-mailing Glenn Daif-Burns at glenn@privacylaws.com, Tel + 44 (0)20 8868 9200.

2. EU Justice Commissioner outlines DP reforms

In a speech in Brussels on 16 March, Viviane Reding outlined her plans for reform of the European Union’s Data Protection Directive. She said that key elements of the reform would be the “right to be forgotten”, transparency, privacy by default and protection regardless of data location. She intends to produce legislative proposals in the summer which has been interpreted as in July.

A full report will appear in the next issue of Privacy Laws & Business International in April.

3. US FTC gives evidence on Do-Not-Track

On 16 March the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) reported to the US Senate Commerce committee on privacy and implementation of the "Do Not Track" System. The Commission has acted to protect consumer privacy through enforcement actions, consumer education, and policy initiatives such as its privacy report. “Do Not Track”, which would allow consumers to choose not to have their Internet browsing tracked by third parties, has been adopted by two of the major companies offering Internet browsers, Microsoft and Mozilla. The FTC says that universal implementation is needed, so that consumers do not have to opt out as they go from site to site.

A report on the FTC’s evidence will appear in the next issue of Privacy Laws & Business International.

For further details on the Privacy Laws & Business International Newsletter, please click here.

Copyright Privacy Laws & Business 2011 

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