PL&B International E-news, Issue 40

30/01/2006
Tags:
  1. New Italian law requires Internet cafes to record ID information on clients
  2. Australia to introduce legislation to aid information exchange in an emergency
  3. Federal Trade Commission releases progress report on US Congress’s antispam law
  4. Google fights US Government over demand for search records
  5. Boston man steals eBay customers’ identities
  6. Tasmania: Another Australian State adds data protection law
  7. Government of British Columbia hosts 7th annual Privacy and Security Conference

1. New Italian law requires Internet cafes to record ID information on clients

A new Italian law requires businesses offering Internet access to the public to ask clients for identification, and to keep photocopies. Such businesses must also be registered with their local police station, as part of an anti-terror package approved after July’s bombings in London. Café owners are complaining about an increased work load, and decreased profits. Many clients either do not have their passports, or are unwilling to show them. Italy is the only country in the European Union to require Internet cafes to record ID information on clients, although Switzerland also requires clients at Internet cafes to show ID. Several Asian countries, such as China, however, also require registration at Internet cafes.

Source: www.cnn.com

2. Australia to introduce legislation to aid information exchange in an emergency

Australia’s Federal Government has said that new legislation is necessary in order to remove any doubts about the legality of exchanging personal information in an emergency. The recent Asian tsunami, and Bali bombings, have revealed a need to clarify privacy issues and to streamline the provision of support services in a disaster. “There may not always be time to resolve any potential privacy issues and apply the Privacy Act on a case-by-case basis,” said Attorney-General Philip Ruddock, who has announced that a bill is planned for this year in order to amend the Privacy Act so that information exchange is easier in such a situation.

Source: www.smh.com.au

3. Federal Trade Commission releases progress report on US Congress’s antispam law

A Federal Trade Commission report, released in December, says that more must be done to fight unsolicited bulk e-mail. The report, entitled “Effectiveness and Enforcement of the CAN SPAM Act” reviews the two-year-old antispam law and outlines new challenges. It also advocates additional legislation in order to give the FTC increased powers in order to go after international spammers.

To see the report, visit: www.ftc.gov/reports/canspam05/05122canspamrpt.pdf
Source: www.abcnews.go.com

4. Google fights US Government over demand for search records

California-based Google is to fight a move by the Bush Administration ordering the internet search engine to hand over records. The Government is attempting to revive an online child pornography law that was struck down by the Supreme Court two years ago. The US Justice Department has requested access to the records as part of this effort.

Source: www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,11069-2000551,00.html

5. Boston man steals eBay customers’ identities

A Boston man was indicted early this month on charges that he hacked into eBay’s site and stole user’s credit card details in order to purchase over $32,000 worth of online gift certificates. Sean Galvez, 20, had accessed more than 40 accounts and changed the passwords. The United States Postal Inspector traced the purchases to Galvez’ home after customers told eBay that their passwords were not working.

Source: The Associated Press

6. Tasmania: Another Australian State adds data protection law

Tasmania is now the sixth jurisdiction in Australia to adopt a public sector privacy law. The Personal Information Protection Act 2004 applies to “personal information custodians” (defined in s.3) including state government agencies, statutory boards and government business enterprises, the University of Tasmania, as well as local councils and any other organisation or person who has entered into a “personal information contract”. The Act does not establish a Privacy Commissioner but relies on the existing Ombudsman scheme to manage complaints.

7. Government of British Columbia hosts 7th annual Privacy and Security Conference
The Government of British Columbia’s 7th annual Privacy and Security Conference, entitled “Who Do You Trust? Privacy and Security is Everyone’s Responsibility”, is taking place on February 9 & 10, 2006 in Victoria, Canada. Panel sessions will include discussions about spyware, viruses and malware; corporate privacy policies; managing digital records; wireless security; and privacy and security in the face of a disaster.

To register, visit: www.rebootconference.com/privacy2006/register.htm

For further details on the Privacy Laws & Business International Newsletter, please click here.

Copyright Privacy Laws & Business 2006

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